Visa & Passport

Entering Tanzania requires both a Tanzanian visa (for the entire length of your stay) and a passport with a remaining validity of at least 6 months.

You are recommended to apply for a tourist visa in advance at the closest Tanzanian Embassy. If available you can even request an online visa.

It is possible to get a tourist visa for a single entry on arrival at main ports of entry to Tanzania, but this is subject to the fulfilment of all immigration requirments.

Driving in Tanzania

Driving in Tanzania is not recommended because roads conditions are not very good, and sometimes not accessible. In addition there is the left-hand drive.

Health, vaccinations and hygiene.

If you are traveling from an area where the yellow fever is present (Kenya, Ethiopia, etc.), and you are older than one year, you will be required to have a yellow fever vaccination as a condition of entry. This condition also applies to travellers subjected to long flight connections (transit) in yellow fever endemic country for more than 12 hours or if they leave the transit airport.

Tanzania is now mapped as low risk country because no yellow fever virus has been isolated in the country. However, because it was a serious issue in the past and Tanzania is bordered by yellow fever endemic countries, the authorities want to adopt this precaution to increase health safety.

For Malaria, vaccination is not compulsory, and it depends on you.

What to pack and wear

There is no dress code for safari, however you are advised to wear inconspicuous and cotton clothes in brown, green, khaki or other neutral colors, to not draw attention to yourself or frighten the animals away.

The tsetse flies (vectors of Malaria) seem to be attracted to specific colors, in particular black and blue, therefore it is recommended that you do not wear these dark colors.

Preventive measures from the Tanzania’s Government are aimed at minimizing the contact with these flies. Vectors control is the primary strategy in use. This is usually done with traps or screens in combination with insecticides and odors that attract the flies.

It is also advisable that you dress lightly and comfortably, long pants and long-sleeved shirts, comfortable and closed walking shoes or boots, warmer clothes for the evening, windbreaker and waterproof jacket, lightweight scarf, hat and sunglasses.

You are best shielded against the insects and burns by wearing long clothes, socks and shoes in order to minimize the exposure of your skin. Tropical insects repellent is also highly recommended, as well as sunscreen and hygiene wipes.

Other travel tips:

  • Remember to clean your hands often;
  • Only use bottled water;
  • Boil water up to 20 minutes, filter and decant it before using it for food;
  • Avoid ice in your drinks;
  • Avoid vegetables and seafood unless cooked;
  • See a doctor and request a blood test in case you feel symptoms of general unwell as diarrhea, fever or vomit.

Charity and almsgiving

In Tanzania is really common to see children asking charities, especially to white people – synonymous of wealth. Even if it is heartbreaking to see their conditions you should never give them money because you are encouraging the families to keep their kids off school to beg for money. Because of this, the Tanzanian Government is acting and it will punish parents who fail to ensure their children go to school. Helping children off the streets and into schools gives them a chance to improve their lives and build a better future.

Clothes and scholastic equipment could be more helpful, and if you would like to provide a donation, ask your tour guide the better option to do it. A money donation to support schools, hospitals and villages can be made with many not for profit organizations. Sun and Dust collaborates with a charity organization called “La carovana del sorriso”, which supports children in need. If you would like to support them, we are happy to show you their village.

What to pack and wear

There is no dress code for safari, however you are advised to wear inconspicuous and cotton clothes in brown, green, khaki or other neutral colors, to not draw attention to yourself or frighten the animals away.

The tsetse flies (vectors of Malaria) seem to be attracted to specific colors, in particular black and blue, therefore it is recommended that you do not wear these dark colors.

Preventive measures from the Tanzania’s Government are aimed at minimizing the contact with these flies. Vectors control is the primary strategy in use. This is usually done with traps or screens in combination with insecticides and odors that attract the flies.

It is also advisable that you dress lightly and comfortably, long pants and long-sleeved shirts, comfortable and closed walking shoes or boots, warmer clothes for the evening, windbreaker and waterproof jacket, lightweight scarf, hat and sunglasses.

You are best shielded against the insects and burns by wearing long clothes, socks and shoes in order to minimize the exposure of your skin. Tropical insects repellent is also highly recommended, as well as sunscreen and hygiene wipes.

Local customs

Certainly Tanzania’s temperatures are really high, but you should always dress modestly, avoid wearing short dresses and sleeveless tops.

Tanzania is, overall, a safe country to visit and Tanzanians are welcoming and well disposed towards visitors, but you should be sensitive to local culture. Disrespecting behaviors to their habits and costumes or their political belief, will cause offence and could be dangerous. There are severe penalties against tourist robbery, however avoid township unless you visit as part of an organized tour. Make sure not to walk alone at night and outside the campsite and don’t wear valuables. You should not take hidden pictures of local people: it is a better practice to ask Masai the consent for photos and to be thankful by giving them a tip.